Damaged Bunker Build – Gallery

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Good news! I’ve managed to pacify the youngest child long enough to post something on here. I still don’t have too much time however, so I’m keeping this post short and sweet. Bellow is a gallery of my last terrain build. Based on the first bunker I blogged about earlier, this one has more detail, and far less cover. I tried to keep a kind of photo diary of how I built it, and hopefully you’ll enjoy watching it come together.

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Project: Hide from the Dakka!

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Back like the renegade master. Or something.

So back in the dim and distant past, I was working on a scratch-built 40k bunker. Despite the fact that updates on the project were as elusive as my local MP, the project was progressing well. So well in fact, that the thing was finished, used on the tabletop, and providing inspiration for the next one. Well now I’ve finally gotten off my lazy ass, and taken enough photos to write the final update.

Looking back at the overall process, there are some things I’d do differently, but I’m more that happy with how it’s come out. It looks good on the table, and I made it myself. I’m planning  to make a second one, and hopefully I’ll improve the design enough to be happy to post up the plans. Until then, enjoy the gallery of photos below.

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Nephilim Build: The Final Episode!

 

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Dakka Dakka!

Dakka Dakka!

So here we go. Delayed by Christmas, video games, and a reluctance to pick up a camera and take photos, the Neph is finally finished. Truth be told the thing was done a while ago, but as usual, my mind had moved on to other projects, and I forgot all about the last one. Even now, I’m typing this in between working on something.

Last episode, all that was left to do was some highlighting and the main gun. Highlighting-wise, all that was really done was a touch of silver on all the rivets, and on the various metal parts and some of the scratches. Both main weapons were painted and magnetised, and that’s all! I’ve thoroughly enjoyed building the Nephilim. I’d like to get another and build the Dark Talon too, but that’s for the future.

Below is a gallery of shots of the Neph. I hope you enjoy them.

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Nephilim Build: Part 3

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The update with slideshows!

So Nuln Oil washing, huh? Get crazy with that shit, bro! Seriously, I put it on almost everything. There’s loads of detail on the Nephilim, and it’d be a shame to lose it. After washing I tackled the dread job of edge highlighting. Normally I don’t bother on my Greenwing vehicles, but on all the all black Ravenwing, its kind of a necessity.

Weathering was kept simple. I drybrushed some of the edges with the same edge highlight grey colour to simulate worn paint, and then after that I drybrushed on some silver. Another quick wash with some Nuln to dampen that down, and I was done. For the wings, I wanted a slightly different look, so I began with sponging on some black. Once dried I sponged on some silver, then washed them back removing most of the wash with a cotton bud.

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All that’s left now is to fit the canopy (this bit is actually done), a few highlights here and there, and paint the main weapons. But! That’s for next time. So until then….

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To save myself from edge highlighting hell, I put the Neph down for a while to work on the flying base. Rather than do a long write-up on what I did to the base, I snapped a load of shots of it with my phone along the way. There’s no fancy techniques involved, the pictures tell it all.

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Nephilim Build: Part 2

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Zooooommm! Zoooooommm Dakka dakka dakka!

Yes, I have been swooping my half built Nephilim around, and making those kinds of noises. Because why wouldn’t you? Last update, I’d finished painting the cockpit, and so it was time to fit it inside the fuselage, and assemble the model.

First things first, glue the bloody cockpit in! With that in and masked up, I sprayed the whole model with Army Painter Matt Black Colour Primer.

Nephilim cockpit

The next step was base coating everything that wasn’t going to be black. So much silver!

Nephilim top

On the underside there was yet more silver! I’ve always liked the Gold/Silver/White colour scheme for the Dark Angels logo, so I used here on the underside of the missile pods. A touch of Vallejo copper was used to add a little detail to the engines.

Nephilim underside

 

Next up is Nuln Oil wash all over the base-coated bits, and final assembly. But as I’m super-slow about updating this project, that will have to wait. Trust me, I DO have the photos ready!

Project: Hide from the Dakka! – Hot Bunker Action!

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After last week’s sexy Plasticard-adding adventures, I’ve moved on to splashing some more paint on this bad boy. Having some sort of notional idea that there would be a number of these bunkers dotted about the landscape, I decided this would be bunker number ten. I admit, it was mainly because I thought painting an ‘X’ would be easier than doing any other numeral, but ten is as good a number as any other.

Step one was painting all the bits of plastic. Falling back on my old favourite Army Painter colour primer, I gave everything a coat of Gunmetal.  Next up, I painted the raised edging strip on the roof yellow, and painted a yellow square in the center of the roof. With an ‘X’ cut out of some masking sheet I had lying around, I painted the numeral over the square, and free-handed some black stripes on the edging. Making use of those transfers we all have in our bits box, I slapped on some Aquilas and a corresponding ‘X’ on the bunker doors.

Bunker painted

Weathering! I started by washing the bunker with some Nuln Oil. While that was drying, I attacked the plastic parts with sponges. Using some Army Painter Gunmetal, I sponged on some paint over the edges and the painted number panel to simulate chipping and scratches. Switching to artist acrylics, I sponged on some Burnt Umber to simulate rust. With the sponge still in my hand, I also went over the doors and the metal cladding to rust them up too. The good thing about artist acrylics is that they’re quite thick, and when you sponge them on you get quite a nice texture. Thinning the Burnt Umber right down, I used it as a wash and covered the whole of the roof, sponging off bits here and there.

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With the weathering done, it’s time to move on to the base and add various finishing touches, but that’s for the next update! Until next time…

Project: Hide From The Dakka! – The Bunker Build

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Tails from the Bunker!

A little while ago, I wrote about how my games of Warhammer 40K have been utter dakka-fests due to us having no battlefield scenery or terrain of any kind. Along with adding some of GW’s plastic buildings to my shopping list, I decided to scratch-build some too. Taking inspiration from the Dawn of War II game, I picked an octagonal bunker as the first thing to build.

W40K Bunker

First on my to do list was to decided how big I wanted it to be. First; I wanted to fit a whole ten man Tactical Squad in it, and second; I wanted to use a pair of Rhino main hatch doors as the bunker entrance. With those two things giving me a rough idea of width and height, I sketched out some vague ideas. In the end I went with six inches wide, and three inches tall. The circular base is just over eight and a half inches in diameter. After some trial and error, cutting an re-cutting, I ended up with the below results.

Foamcard Bunker

Layering foamcard was more labour-intensive than I liked, but as this whole thing was giant experiment, I used materials I had lying around. If I were to do it again, I’d use some of that high-density insulating foam, and carve it to shape. Anyway, after glueing all the various bits of foamcard together with No More Nails, I moved on to texturing it. After rooting through my decorating supplies, I came up with a mixture of Polyfiller (the one you mix yourself), Unibond PVA sealer, and water. This gloopy liquid would not only seal the foamcard, but also leave a rough textured finish that hopefully would look something like concrete.

Foamcard Bunker

 

After three or four coats of the gloop, I attacked the bunker with some artists acrylics. After laying down a dark base of graphite grey, I sponged on lighter shades of grey, working up, until I ended up with the above picture. Some edge highlighting with a white would complete the painting at this stage, as I moved on to adding some Plasticard details.

Taking the Dawn of War bunker as my starting point, I cut out some plastic pieces to create some metal cladding for the base walls. I also cut out a plastic octagon for the roof of the bunker. With the doors of the bunker glued closed, lifting the roof off would be the only access to the interior, so the two vent pipes I attached would come in handy. Finally, I edged the whole thing with a strip of plastic, for no other reason than I liked it.

In the next part I paint the plastic parts, and start the weathering process!

Nephilim Build: Part 1

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My latest project is the much maligned Dark Angels flyer, the Nephilim. Despite what the internet has to say about this flyer, I think it’s a cool model, so I’m having one. Besides, it was a father’s day present from my children and it’d be rude not to build it.

Stage one is to assemble the various parts of it, and decide which bits I want to paint before final assembly. Looking at the bits below, the obvious choices are the cockpit interior and the pilot, but I’ll also be painting the aerial arrays and their covers, the two front bolters, and the Lascannon and Mega Bolter main weapons separately.

Nephilim Jet - Preparation

Tackling the cockpit first, I glued it together and primed it with some GW Skull White spray. Knowing that the whole thing was predominantly black, I decided I needed something different for the cockpit, and went with grey. After I’d slapped on some a base colour and a layer, I laid down some base colours on the buttons and screens. Next was a wash with some Nuln Oil, and some layer paints on the detail bits. Last up was a touch of weathering just to give a used look. The panel in front of the pilot was done in the same way, and once done, I could begin assembly.

Nephilim Cockpit Interior

Next time I’ll be moving on to painting the models exterior, and making a start on attaching the various detail parts. Until then TTFN!

Back Down the 40k Rabbit Hole: Epilogue II

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Sect Anarkus

The one where I am overrun by cults…

Honestly, I don’t know how people paint horde armies. Just doing ten of these was enough to make my teeth itch. The next ten are currently in the process of being painted, and then I’m done with the wee bastards.

Seriously, I’m quite pleased with how these guys have turned out. They add a nice bit of flavour to the battlefield, and I think I’ve managed to capture the dirty, filthy nature of Chaos. I had to get my head down and power through them, but I think it was worth it.

Cultist Anarkus

Flamethrower Cultist

Back Down the 40k Rabbit Hole: Epilogue I

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Hellbrute - Front

These titles are getting more ridiculous…

So the poor old Chaos half of the Dark Vengeance box has had to make do with being fitted in, in between work on building my Dark Angels army. This slow progress is epitomised by the mighty Hellbrute here. He’s been sitting on the project bench for absolutely ages, slowly gaining more paint as and when. Thankfully he’s done all done now, and can get stuck in to melting my tactical squad!

Hellbrute - Rear

Hellbrute - Top

 

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